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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 3, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. all non—urgent operations and outpatient appointments in england are put on hold because of mounting pressure on the nhs. up to 55,000 patients are affected. senior doctors say demand has increased rapidly over the festive period. ijust want i just want to do a ijust want to do a good job. i want to do the best i can for the patients i am seeing. i want to do the best i can but i am not being given the resources to do thatjob properly. good morning. it's wednesday, january third. also this morning: storm eleanor brings winds of up to 84 miles an hour to many parts of the uk, causing disruption to travel and power supplies. yes, storm allen ault is moving to
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the north sea and winds will gradually ease but we have some windy conditions today across the southern half of the country —— storm eleanor. iwill southern half of the country —— storm eleanor. i will have your full forecast at 6:15am. and a special report on how the opening of the uk's first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic conditions could change the lives of people like james. conditions could change the lives of people like james. over the last three orfour people like james. over the last three or four years we have noticed a huge difference from bandages to experimental treatments and research thatis experimental treatments and research that is going on. whether we streamed it, downloaded it or bought a cd, we consumed nearly 10% more music in 2017 than the year before. i'll have the details shorlty. in sport, manchester city are back to winning ways and are 15 points clear at the top of the table once again. they scored after just 39 seconds last night, comfortably beating watford. good morning. first, our main story. health chiefs in england have insisted there's no crisis in the nhs, despite their decision
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to extend the postponement of all non—urgent operations and routine outpatient appointments until the beginning of next month. officials say they have taken early action to ease winter pressures and avoid last minute cancellations. but senior doctors say pressure escalated rapidly over the festive period. it's estimated 55,000 patients could be affected. 0ur health editor hugh pym has more. ambulance siren. there is always great pressure on the nhs in the new year. but the strains seem even bigger this year. two ambulance services in england, covering the north—east and east, are on the highest state of operational alert, asking families to use their own transport to bring patients into hospital where possible. the trust running scarborough and york hospital said that the high numbers of patients and staff were under considerable pressure. there
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area number of under considerable pressure. there are a number of emergency departments around the country and thatis departments around the country and that is the worst i have seen. i just want to do a good job. i want to do the best i can for the patients i am seeing. i want to do the best i can but i am not being given the resources to do thatjob properly. twitter carried reports from some staff at other hospitals. 0ne emergency doctor in stoke city personally apologised to local people for what he called third world conditions due to overcrowding. nhs england has told hospitals to postpone or nonurgent operations and outpatient appointments to the end ofjanuary, an escalation of measures announced just before christmas. in that time hospitals won't be paralysed for putting patients in mixed sex wards. this is planned response to winter that we knew was going to be difficult and we are managing that in the way that we expected and we are taking early action. we are not waiting to have to respond to a problem. the authorities in scotland, wales and northern ireland
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have said they are facing high demand from patients and more on frontline services with flu cases on the increase, the worry now is that a predicted outbreak may become a reality. storm eleanor has battered the country overnight. winds gusting up to 84 miles per hour have caused flooding, damage to buildings and travel disruption. hundreds of homes across northern ireland, wales, the midlands and south—west england are without power. fallen trees have also closed a number of roads, with motorists being advised to avoid all but essential travel. jon donnison reports. as storm eleanor whipped in from the atlantic, the republic of ireland was the first to take a pounding. in galway there's been severe flooding. though some are still prepared to take their chances. in the uk, the met office issued an amber weather warning for parts of the country. this is anglesey, in wales. waves driven by winds gusting up to 130 kilometres per hour. horizontal hail was what greeted
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anybody foolish enough to brave blackpool‘s promenade. we've got a hell of a storm here... and in corby, the midlands, john recorded the moment his house was hit by hail. across the country more than 15,000 homes have been left without power, the bulk of them in northern ireland. 0n the m25 motorway, traffic was briefly brought to a standstill by a fallen tree. but the full extent of the damage will likely not emerge until later in the morning. and forecasters are warning storm eleanor will continue to bring strong winds until the end of the day. 0ur reporter chris dearden is in portmadog in north wales, where the storm struck in the early hours of this morning. good morning. how have things being? as you have seen in the pictures,
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there were some big waves on the coast of wales. it is almost four yea rs coast of wales. it is almost four years to the day since a storm surge caused damage to aberystwyth promenade and similar scenes to aberystwyth last night, where the waves we re aberystwyth last night, where the waves were driven high into the air, crashing down to the seafront. also on the welsh coast, in barmouth, we had similar large waves and they went over the harbour and caused localised flooding in the town. there are 36 flood warnings in place around wales, 30 flood alert as well, including a flood warning in porthmadog, where we are this morning. further inland we had reports of a tree landing on a roof in cardiff, and a roof partly torn off in barry, and we hope to get more details on that this morning. in general, travel disruption has been felt on major roads around wales. we have had restrictions on
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some of the major bridge crossings like the second severn and britannia bridge here in the north of wales as well, and ferry services across the irish sea in most cases cancelled. 0ne irish sea in most cases cancelled. one man described the journey he took from aberystwyth to the south of wales as rather like a steeplechase, in other words having to dodge obstacles above ground just to dodge obstacles above ground just to make his way from a to b. police are dealing with fallen trees all over the place. 0ne control room turned around and said when we asked where the problem was that it was everywhere. a lot of damage overnight and as it gets lighter the full extent of the damage will become clearer. and people must stay in touch with their local radio stations to find out what's going on. thank you. president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." last month, the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, said he would reject any peace plan from the us after mr trump recognised jerusalem as israel's capital.
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in a series of tweets, mr trump also boasted to the leader of north korea about america's nuclear button. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has more. another twitter tirade by donald trump. the president questions why the us should continue to provide aid to countries that show no respect in return and don't reciprocate. 0n the middle east, he tweets the status ofjerusalem, which the us now recognises as the capital of israel, will no longer be part of future negotiations. us ambassador to the united nations, nikki haley, confirmed that us aid to the palestinians was in jeopardy. we very much still want to have a peace process. nothing changes with that.
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the palestinians now have to show their will, that they want to come to the table. as of now they are not coming to the table but they ask for aid. in another tweet, the president turned his attentions back to north korea. apparently responding to a new year message from kim jong—un in which he said the country's nuclear weapons could reach anywhere in the us. mr trump tweets... it marks a new tone and new level of rhetoric in the nuclear crisis with north korea. officials in peru say at least 48 people were killed when a coach plummeted down a cliff on a dangerous stretch of road near the capital, lima. a total of 50 five people were on board the bus which landed upside down on a deserted beach.
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the accident happened on the notorious devil's turn bend of the pacific coastal road as sarah corker reports. the blue bus landed upside down on a rocky beach, next to the pacific ocean. more than 50 people were on board when it crashed. witnesses say the coach collided with another vehicle and then went over the edge of this cliff, plummeting more than 100 metres. it happened on the notorious devil's turn of the pasamayo road, 50 kilometres from the coach's final destination, lima. the rocky site is difficult for rescuers to reach. survivors were winched up by rope, and some airlifted to local hospitals. translation: they told us the bus had fallen off the cliff, here in pasamayo. it was an accident. we thought that my niece had left around that time in the bus. she went with her boyfriend.
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the two of them were in the same seat. the pacific ocean road is often listed among the world's most dangerous roads and, despite the sheer drops, it's largely unprotected by safety fences. police say the death toll is likely to rise. the united states says it plans to call an emergency session of the un security council on iran, where anti—government protests have continued for a sixth day, leaving at least 22 people dead. washington has dismissed as ridiculous a claim by iran's supreme leader ayatollah ali khamenei that the country's enemies orchestrated the unrest. the iranian government has warned it will organise counter rallies in areas where demonstrations have been strongest. a man is due in court charged with murdering a woman whose body was discovered in a disused building in finsbury park in north london last week. 22—year—old iuliana tudos went missing after visiting frinds on christmas eve.
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31—year—old kasim lewis will appear before magistrates in wimbledon later. an irish footballer has scored his first big victory of the year by winning the lottery. preston north end's kevin 0'connor was visiting family in ireland when he found out he had won a million euros. his uncle had bought him the ticket earlier in the month. kevin says he has no immediate plans for the money and his main focus was helping his team climp up the league. how about giving the uncle some money? that would be nice. what do you think? it is a nice start to the new year. what about that? not bad at all. i used to do that. i would put lottery tickets into friends' birthday cards. did you? as far as i know, no one has won. have you lost contact with them? some of them suddenly have a nice car? what have
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you got for us? it is all making sense for manchester city. no hangover for them. they are back to their winning ways. leaders manchester city made it a 20th premier league win of the season last night, as they beat watford 3—1. raheem sterling scored afterjust 39 seconds as pep guardiola's side once again go 15 ponts clear at the top. tottenham are back upto fifth following a 2—0 victory at bottom of the table swansea. delli alli rounded off the victory, and the defeat leaves swansea four points from safety. can england finally get a win down under? spinner mason crane is drafted in for his debut in the final ashes test in sydney starting this evening. and andy murray says he may need surgery on his long—term hip injury after withdrawing from the brisbane international. he's not played competitively sincejuly, and says surgery was a "secondary option, but something i may have to consider. let's hope not". he said it has been quite a
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moralising for him. yes, it is a real worry. thank you. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. all eyes are on you this morning, trying to assess just how bad the storm is. is the picture? good morning. a nasty storm. a wild night. in populated areas, very windy. 90 miles per hour in bangor in northern ireland and even in london, to the south of dorset, in the last few hours. a trail of damage across the country. high seas in the uk. coastalflooding damage across the country. high seas in the uk. coastal flooding which damage across the country. high seas in the uk. coastalflooding which is still ongoing. storm eleanor. some
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good news. it is pushing off into the north sea. that means the wind will is down. —— ease. it will remain strong and gusty, the wind, through this morning's rush—hour. showers rattling across the south. 50-60 showers rattling across the south. 50—60 miles per hour gusts. cloud and rain in the midlands. it will go down through the morning rush—hour. starting to ease in western scotland and northern ireland for the time being. some of the calmest conditions in the north—east of the mainland of scotland. frost and fog to begin with. light winds here. some of the dry to bright as conditions. —— driest and brightest. western scotland and northern
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ireland will have the strongest winds through the afternoon. cold in the wind the further north you are. tonight, showers in scotland. frost in northern and mainland scotland. elsewhere, cloud and rain in western england and wales and northern ireland late in the night, keeping temperatures up. chilly in the north and east of the uk tomorrow morning. the morning, low pressure. mild weather. after heavy overnight rain, surface water around in the morning. things brightening up with sunny spells. 12—13. the north of the uk, rather cold through thursday. the rain band could bring sleet and snow. part of scotland will be dry and bright and cold. further south, cooler on friday. sunny spells. cold
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airtakes cooler on friday. sunny spells. cold air takes hold for all of us as we get to the weekend. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. the storm was overnight. the first super moon. i love this picture. a rather wonderful picture. we talked about this on breakfast. rail prices. 0utcry over rail prices. the minister has taken flight, they say. he says it was preplanned. price rises announced some time ago. yes. i was talking about yesterday. everyone... it is amazing how many people are talking about it. i was walking through and someone had to say something to me about it. they trust you, steph. the mail. the
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guardian as well. if anyone actually... this is about the pressure on the nhs over the christmas period. some surgeries are being delayed until february, now, and it is on the guardian as well. if you have been involved in these situations, let us know this morning. we will be talking about it this morning. a real squeeze on accident and emergency in particular. the telegraph. the front page. you have a great system of filing over there. anyway. women who flock to britain to give birth could be cheating the nhs out £60 million per year. the mirror. dentists denied nhs care are being treated by charity. the telegraph. this is a
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still from a new documentary on the bbc which is, in which, the queen shares childhood memories of her coronation. bear in mind how rarely the queen talks to camera. you just hear the occasional bit of her talking to other people. it should be interesting. what have you got? in my filing system i have good news about manufacturing at the end of the year. a lot of analysis of annual figures. good morning, everyone. the guardian says britain's manufacturing finished 2017 on a positive footing, the strongest growth in three years. they say this is a resurgent year. a picture of someone making a bicycle. something we successfully exported. more figures coming out. also, guess
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what i am going to talk about. easter! shops have already got easter! shops have already got easter eggs. i saw an advert for it. no. it happens too quickly! christmas trees are still up! i still feel christmassy. christmas trees are still up! i still feel christmassylj christmas trees are still up! i still feel christmassy. i have tinsel up over the fireplace. it is 0k. what tinsel up over the fireplace. it is ok. what have you got? there is a lot on andy murray after the rather emotional and heartfelt message he put on instagram yesterday about possibly needing surgery on a hip injury. it has been a long—term injury. it has been a long—term injury he has suffered with. he has not played for six months. you just wonder, after getting to the number one position in the world last year, how much he is suffering at the moment. and talk about playing through the pain barrier, we have this in the telegraph. interestingly, it is about bowling.
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james anderson, the england player, talking about how it is very rare for him not to ball without paying. he says it is sometimes difficult letting on a t—shirt and brushing his teeth. —— bowl without pain. letting on a t—shirt and brushing his teeth. -- bowl without pain. we are hearing more and more of the toll it takes on professional athletes. he says you have to manage your body and your injuries. the new year, going back to the gym. anyway, i like this. this is proof you do not need to go to the gym, you can access at home. a rather wonderful lady, a mother, trying to lose weight after the birth of her daughter to be she has become the strongest woman. she goes to the gym and trains hard, obviously. but she does weightlifting with her daughter, as you can see.|j does weightlifting with her daughter, as you can see. i do not do any cooking. so you cannot do any
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weightlifting while doing the cooking. i will talk to you about that later. thank you very much. see you later on. the uk's first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic diseases and skin conditions has opened in london. the centre at st thomas' hospital has been designed with the specialist needs of its patients in mind, featuring curved furniture and ultra—violet free lighting to prevent damaging delicate skin. graeme satchell has been to meet one patient who hopes the new unit will help to change his life for the better. st thomas' hospital in london. 24—year—old james is heading to the new rare diseases centre. hello. nice to see you. james is here to get some news. come on in, james. thank you, nice and spacious.
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couple of weeks ago, his consultant found a cancerous lump in his left hand. so, last week, you came, we cut that out for you. i can tell you the good news is it is completely out. there is no cancer left. thank you. thank you! i have been worried about that. thank you. i was really nervous. luckily, it hasn't spread, so nervous. luckily, it hasn't spread, so it is fantastic. yeah. yeah. we will celebrate later. james has a life shortening rare genetic skin condition called eb. it affects around 5000 people in the uk. james loop is skin is as delicate as a butte rfly's loop is skin is as delicate as a butterfly‘s wing. —— james' i am missing the anchors between the skin. 80% of
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missing the anchors between the skin. 8096 of my body is covered in chronic wounds. i have to bandage all of the wounds. you can only see my arms. i have this kind of bandage from my neck down. it is hard. yeah... i cannot explain it. it is like your body all hurts. your dad says he is over the moon. it brings together specialist services for wreck conditions in one place for the first time. —— rare. it will mean better conditions for people like james and more collaboration between expats. there are reasons to between expats. there are reasons to be cheerful. —— experts. we just patch people up before. now we can have gene therapy, or some therapy, and hopefully, one day, eddy cue. have gene therapy, or some therapy, and hopefully, one day, eddy cuem germany, this 90 rod has had success
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for treatment to replace 80% of his skin. —— a cure. the new treatment will not work for everyone with eb, but it could help with a condition thatis but it could help with a condition that is severely life limiting. the la st that is severely life limiting. the last 3—4 years, we noticed a huge difference, from bandages to experimental treatments and research going on all around the world. take care, safe journey. james is going home. for all of the debilitating pain of his condition, he and his mother are relatively upbeat. we have a good life. you don't know what is around the corner. keep fighting. keep fighting every day. james knows his time may be running out, but with the help from the new ra re out, but with the help from the new rare diseases centre and his remarkable spirit, there is always
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hope. graham satchell, bbc news. what an extremely remarkable young man. it rather puts things in perspective. doesn't it? it is time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. homeless families in london are being pressured to accept offers of housing outside the capital. bbc london visited one family from redbridge who had to spend christmas and the new year in this hotel room because they refused to accept the council's offer to house them in southend. 0ne housing lawyer said the lack of affordable social housing was forcing families out the capital. 0rdinary people doing ordinaryjobs just cannot make ends meet, and that
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is creating relentless pressure, pushing people to be peripheries of london, pushing people outside of london, pushing people outside of london, tearing up the communities, pulling people out of work, pulling people out of school. it is just not good enough. it's emerged that a bedbug infestation which struck the palace of westminster has not been brought under control. the managers of the westminster estate have said urgent action is being taken. the bugs are not dangerous, nor do they spread disease, but their bites can cause skin irritation. the mayor has announced london's one—hour bus hopper ticket is to go unlimited this month. the one—hour fare will be live by the end of january, allowing passengers to transfer between buses as much as they like within sixty minutes— even if they travel on the tube in between journeys. later this year, transport for london plans to introduce weekly capping on 0yster cards. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's no service on the metropolitan line between uxbridge and harrow—on—the—hill due to a tree on the track. and that same tree is also causing problems on the piccadilly line between rayners lane and uxbridge.
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this is how it's looking approaching the blackwall tunnel. that's the southern approach from blackwall lane following an earlier breakdown. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it is likely storm eleanor is tracking across us to the east. we sought it gusting 73 miles per hour in london. a squeeze of the isobars through the day today. sunny spells, though, at times. when the showers come through, especially gusty. the met office has a weather warning for the wind until six o'clock this evening. as is the nature with showers, they will be
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hit and miss. nature with showers, they will be hitand miss. some nature with showers, they will be hit and miss. some fine weather as well. they will be heavy. weekly going through, with hail and thunder. —— quickly. we start tomorrow morning with the next belt of wet weather having worked in overnight. clearing up as the day goes on. largely dry with a late sunshine for the afternoon. a mild feel of ii— 12 degrees. if you like the mild feel, make the most of tomorrow. the weekend, temperatures sliding away. it looks like it will turn much colder next week. if you are heading out, please take care. that is it. i will be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as one of the most senior met police officers calls on people to pull together to tackle knife crime, we'll hear why the mayor of london is urging all schools to use metal detectors to help prevent attacks.
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while millions of people enjoy playing video games, we'll be finding out why the world health organisation has listed gaming disorder as a mental health condition. you might think this is all treats, but this is all low—calorie. you might think this is all treats, but this is all low-calorie. no. it is, it is low—calorie. and michelin—starred chef tom kerridge will be here to reveal how he lost an incredible 12 stone and is now helping others become healthy too. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. health chiefs in england have insisted there is no crisis in the nhs despite postponing all nonurgent operations and routine outpatient appointments until the beginning of next month. 0fficials appointments until the beginning of next month. officials say this is to reduce last—minute cancellations. the health minister said the
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necessary steps are ta ken to the health minister said the necessary steps are taken to ensure that patients are seen as quickly as possible. this is a planned response toa possible. this is a planned response to a winter that we knew was going to a winter that we knew was going to be difficult and we are managing that in the way that we expected. and we are taking early action. we are not waiting to have to respond to the problem. storm eleanor has battered the country overnight. winds gusting up to 100 miles per hour have caused flooding, damage to buildings and travel disruption. hundreds of homes across northern ireland, wales, the midlands and south—west england are without power. fallen trees have also closed a number of roads, with motorists being advised to avoid all but essential travel in some areas. jon donnison reports. as storm eleanor whipped in from the atlantic, the republic of ireland was the first to take a pounding. in galway, there's been severe flooding. some, though, are still prepared to take their chances. in the uk, the met office issued an amber weather warning for parts of the country. this is anglesey, in wales.
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waves driven by winds gusting up to 130 kilometres per hour. horizontal hail was what greeted anybody foolish enough to brave blackpool's promenade. we've got a hell of a storm here... and in corby, the midlands, john recorded the moment his house was hit by hail. across the country more than 15,000 homes have been left without power, the bulk of them in northern ireland. 0n the m25 motorway traffic was briefly brought to a standstill by a fallen tree. but the full extent of the damage will likely not emerge until later in the morning. and forecasters are warning storm eleanor will continue to bring strong winds until the end of the day. president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." last month, the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, said he would reject any peace plan from the us after mr trump recognised jerusalem
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as israel's capital. in a series of tweets, mr trump also boasted to the leader of north korea about america's nuclear button. the united states says it plans to call an emergency session of the un security council on iran, where anti—government protests have continued for a sixth day, leaving at least 22 people dead. we can now speak with rana from the bbc persian service. are these protests continue in? yes, they continued overnight, but mainly in smaller towns and cities, especially in the south of the country. the iranian authorities say the major cities, including the capital, were calm, the videos we have received on social media from the country shows that there are antiriot police and a
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heavy number of security forces deployed in many of the major cities. rana, for the moment, thank you very much. we will be talking about that bit later with an from there. —— with an expert from there. protests against increases to rail fares are being held at a number of stations in scotland today. it comes as scotrail fares increase by an average of 3.2% this year. train operators across the uk say the biggest rise in railfares for five years is necessary to address "decades of under investment". the queen is to make a rare apperance in a television documentary to comment on the experience of her coronation. in the film, which is broadcast next week, the queen is reunited with the original crown from the day. there'll also be interviews from those that took part in the 1953 coronation, including a maid of honour who nearly fainted in the abbey, and a 12—year—old choirboy who was left to sing solo when his overwhelmed colleagues lost their voices. 6:35am, you are right date with the
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news. she nearly fainted. awful, you would forever have remembered if you had. good morning. we are talking about football to start. manchester city, it now, talk that they might have a hangover, because they lost the incredible winning run, but it didn't take them long to get back to winning ways at all, in fact, 39 seconds to score their first goal, which isn't a record. do you know what the fastest goal in the premier league is? i am going to say three seconds. yes, louise, ten seconds. i have a strange memory, somehow i remember that. do you know who it was? no. it was ledley king in 2000. 39 seconds was quite good. let's show you the goal. premier league leaders manchester city are back to their winning ways. they beat watford 3—1 at etihad stadium.
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it was far too easy for raheem sterling, tapped home from sane's ci’oss. sterling, tapped home from sane's cross. the first attack of the game. then sergio aguero scored his 16th of the season and pep guardiola's tea m of the season and pep guardiola's team 15 points clear at the top of the table. we played really good. we could have scored i don't know how many goals. after dropping two points we spoke about what would be our reaction, because the big teams drop points not too much. and since the beginning we had a good performance and we won the game. victories for tottenham and crystal palace. and there was also a big win for west ham, as andy carroll scored his first two goals of the season — the second a 94th—minute winner — to give them victory over fellow strugglers west brom at the london stadium. west brom are now four points from safety. it could have gone
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either way, the game, especially the first half, we were not good, but the second half we were much more like it. and in recent games we felt hard done by, with a decision against newcastle, we were certainly against bournemouth in the last game, and we slipped into the bottom three, and today we were rewarded for keeping at it and, sort of, just being diligent and not giving up. the fifth and final ashes test match sta rts the fifth and final ashes test match starts this evening. england have lost the series, but they have drafted in mason crane to help construct drafted in mason crane to help co nstru ct a drafted in mason crane to help construct a first victory of the tour. there is a bit of sydney harbour site that is four over teesside, the harbour bridge organised built by the english, made great in australia, as the locals would have it, much like cricket. england arrived in slightly more steady shape than they might have been, still no victory but no whitewash
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either and the hope that the gap between these teams might be bridged. the draw in melbourne showed england could be competitive and avoid defeat, but they still haven't taken 20 wickets in a match. with chris woakes injured mason crane, the legspinner who played here for new south wales, whose middle name is sydney, maybe he is made to this place. the way he has conducted himself throughout the trip and since he has been involved in the team, he has been outstanding. for a young man to apply himself and absorb himself in the environment as he has is exactly what you are after. it is a really good chance for him to show everyone what he is capable of, but i think on this service he will be a really good option. australia have to decide whether to pressure the recovering heel of mitchell starc. they have decided to play him. if you were questioning their motivation, they will run this before every session of the test.
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beat england. beat england. beat england! it matters still. every opportunity we have to play on the ground is special and it is another test match. we need no motivation. ashes series take a long time coming around. england have to wait two yea rs around. england have to wait two years to recover the urn. the aim for now is to turn the wheel of little in their direction. the england head coach eddiejones has said he wont be replacing dylan hartley as england captain ahead of the six nations. hartley and his club northampton have had a disappointing season so far butjones says that's irrelevant and certainly isn't intending to lighten the skipper‘s workload either. listen to this. if he does less for england, he won't be with us. in terms of team
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meetings and all of the things that come with being captain. he has a clear role at england and that is to be captain and to be the leader. he understands that. there is no reason why what happens at northampton... it is like you come home, you come from your home and you have had a bad day, you know, the tiles are falling off the bathroom, the rain is coming through the roof and then you have to go and coach, that is yourjob to do and dylan understands it. andy murray says he may have need to have surgery after withdrawing from the brisbane international because of his long—term hip injury. the 30—year—old is down to 16th in the world, having not played sincejuly. murray said surgery was a "secondary option, something i may have to consider but let's hope not". the australian open starts in melbourne on 15th january and the briton added he would decide by the weekend whether to stay in australia or fly home. the former world number one also took to instagram and posted a picture to highlight his desire to be back on the court saying: "i choose this pick as the little kid inside mejust wants to play tennis and compete..
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i genuinely miss it so much and i would give anything to be back out there." it is rare that you see that kind of emotional insight from andy murray. hejust wants emotional insight from andy murray. he just wants to do what he loves. this injury has ruined it for him. absolutely devastating for all sorts of sports men and women. it is difficult to manage your body when you put it under such incredible stress. and the pressure at this time of year to start and get into the games. after the back end of last year when he was world number one with fantastic momentum. thank you so much. hospitals in england have been told to postpone tens of thousands of non—urgent operations and outpatient appointments until the end of this month in an effort to ease winter pressures. the department of health says the nhs is taking the necessary steps to ensure patients are seen as quickly as possible at a time of year when the service is at its busiest. so is this the best approach? let's get the thoughts of professor suzanne mason, who's from the royal college
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of emergency medicine. thank you so much forjoining us. just give us your assessment of how things are at the moment with the nhs. things are desperate at the moment. it has been extremely difficult and challenging for emergency departments and ambulance services to deliver safe and effective ca re services to deliver safe and effective care to patients. departments are extremely crowded and this causes huge problems for staff in being able to assess and treat patients according to their needs. we've got patients spending many hours on trolleys waiting to get a bed on the ward. and this means that as departments become crowded, staff find it hard to provide basic care, let alone advanced treatment, such as intravenous antibiotics and medicines to help relieve symptoms
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of pain and discomfort for patients. 0k. let's talk about measures put in place. we understand hospitals in england have been told to delay planned operations and outpatient appointments. does that help or does it postponed a problem?” appointments. does that help or does it postponed a problem? i found this a curious thing to choose to do, actually. i think cancelling operations, it is unlikely patients will be able to get into hospital for their operation in the first place. there are simply no beds. cancelling an operation now is unlikely to have any effect on the capacity problems we are experiencing. there are no beds in the hospitals. we wouldn't have been able to get the patients in any way. this is likely to be too little too late that won't have an impact at all. in terms of cancelling outpatient appointments, that has no impact on the emergency department whatsoever, apart from freeing up staff to come and help. these staff
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often don't have the experience to manage acute emergency patients and therefore it is limited what they can offer to us in the emergency department. and that is very much your speciality. 0ne department. and that is very much your speciality. one suggestion is co nsulta nts your speciality. one suggestion is consultants from other areas come into emergency departments. will that help? we were very concerned at the royal college of emergency medicine about the suggestion that other speciality consultants could come and help us. those speciality co nsulta nts come and help us. those speciality consultants don't have the experience assessing and unwell patient with an undifferentiated illness at the front door. that is what we do and that is ourjob. and the consultants in other specialties don't have the level of experience thatis don't have the level of experience that is required to do that, i am afraid. it is possible that they could have some impact in terms of turning around patients more quickly on the ward and trying to improve flow so that some of the patients that need a bed can access one more quickly and they are not spending many hours on trolleys in the
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emergency department. another suggestion is that they will suspend the rules on mixed sex wards. would that help and how would it impact people? i am concerned that this is the slippery slope to compromising standards in the nhs. for a long time now we have advocated the use of single sex wards so that patient safety a nd of single sex wards so that patient safety and patient dignity is preserved. if we are now going to compromise on these things then i think this is the start of slippery slope to accepting that these standards are no longer going to be adhered to. can ijust ask, sorry to interrupt, i know that you are having difficulty hearing me, can i ask, you have talked about safety and compromise, is safety at the moment compromised as far as you are concerned? absolutely safety is being compromised, no doubt about that. when patients are in crowded emergency departments and staff
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cannot move between patients and provide the basic care that is required, then safety is compromised. patients who spend many hours on a trolley, often elderly patients, the seekers in the department, they do much worse in the long—term and are likely to have a poor outcome and even die as a result of their experience in the emergency department —— the sickest. and that is a huge tragedy for us in our speciality and that is why we are desperate to see things improve. professor, from the royal college of emergency medicine, thank you very much for spending time with us, thank you. and we will talk more about that through the morning. something else to talk about making headlines. 0vernight, there was a storm, storm eleanor. good morning. a wild night last night. winds
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peaking at 100 miles per hour. that has left a lot of debris on the roads. the latest news on the weather is coming up in ten minutes. there is good news in the forecast toa there is good news in the forecast to a certain extent. storm eleanor, it is now going to the north sea. we still have strong winds through the morning rush—hour, especially in the north of the uk. winds gusting between 50—60 miles per hour. with the recent full moon, there are very high tide. flood warnings around coastal areas in south—west scotland and england and wales. a lot of
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cloud towards the midlands in northern england. rain easing eastwards. it will go down in southern parts of scotland. showers through the rush—hour. quiet conditions. 0nly through the rush—hour. quiet conditions. only one or two showers in the north—east of scotland after a frosty start. sunshine coming and going through the day. a scattering of showers. some with hail and thunder to pick the most frequent in northern ireland in south—west scotland. still blustery in many areas. 7— ten. tonight, gusty winds in england and wales, especially the south. light in the north. a touch of frost with clear skies. a mild start to thursday morning. 0ut wrecks of rain could be expensive and northern ireland, wales, in southern england in particular. surface water on the roads. ——
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extensive. some of the rain will be heavyin extensive. some of the rain will be heavy in the south. it will be on the move. southern areas brightening up. windy. mild. 12—13. cold conditions in southern scotland and northern ireland. sleet and snow on the high ground. the best of the weather will be in northern scotland once again. back to you. thank you very much. and now what have we been consuming more of in 2017? perhaps not what you might think. music is! many different means of getting it. good morning, everyone. whether we streamed it, downloaded it, or bought a cd, we consumed more music in 2017 than the year before according to industry stats out today. downloading music, even vinyls, we consumed 10% more music than last year. of this is being driven by the
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huge increase in streaming music, with half being downloaded. even vinyl with half being downloaded. even vi nyl sales have with half being downloaded. even vinyl sales have picked up in the last ten years. up 26% on last year. in terms of value, all of this music added up to £1.2 billion worth of sales last year. vanessa higgins is the chief executive of the independent record label, regent street, and she's on the bpi council. they did this research. can you explain to us how you make money from music? it is obvious if you buy the cd, that is how the artist gets the cd, that is how the artist gets the money. what about otherwise? the cd, that is how the artist gets the money. what about otherwise ?m isa mix the money. what about otherwise ?m is a mix which are. every song that gets released has different revenue streams. streaming, if you are listening on spotify or something, there is a subscription, or advertisements, that generates money. we have an issue with the
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value gap. some platforms like youtube, they are protected by certain copyright laws currently. that is an area where we are not making revenue. have things got better? there was a point where the music industry was worried about not making money. that was a big concern. we are not back to the heady heights of the 80s and 90s, but we are seeing a lot of improvement. we have nothing growth rates like this since 1998. streaming seems to be helping us turn a corner. the market is strong. even vinyl turn a corner. the market is strong. even vi nyl sales turn a corner. the market is strong. even vinyl sales are up 26%. that is interesting. it is notjust the more mature listener, it is new artists releasing vinyls and younger people buying them. even streaming. 0ld catalogues have fresh life breathed into them and you can discover old favourites. are you surprised we
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have consumed 10% more music than last year? it is hard not to be surprised. the music industry changes quickly. it is encouraging to see rates of growth like this, especially in streaming. it is interesting how quickly things change in music. what do you think is the next thing we have to look to? it is an interesting question, it is my area at the bpi council, as irun it is my area at the bpi council, as i run innovation. the story we are looking at right now is smart speakers. how will they work in the home? if you play a genre, dance music, whatever, what will they play your? who has control of that? will they want specific questions? that is interesting. thank you for coming in on. thank you for having me. that is it from me. who was in control?
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the big question for the morning. thank you. 2018 marks the centenary of the end of the first world war, but did you know that women having the right vote and national institutions, such as the raf, are also 100 years old this year? all this week on breakfast, we're looking at some of the organisations born into an era of great social change, which followed the conflict. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to visit one person who remembers it all, because she lived through it. meet 105—year—old diana gould. i was born on may the 23rd, 1912. you were born before world war i broke out? do you have any memories if all world war i? i remember when i was three years old seeing a bus
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with a horse pulling it, which was quite extraordinary. i remember this huge zepellin coming over. i had never seen or huge zepellin coming over. i had never seen or heard anything like that before the big how could a fly? after the war, it must have in different. so many men did not return. i remember people saying where is bill? where is bert? harry got shot, but he is ok. the second world war, during the daytime, there we re world war, during the daytime, there were planes obviously floating up
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there. i didn't take much notice, then i heard shots coming out of the middle of the road. i thought, that was cheeky. when it first started, the national health service was fantastic. you would just go to the hospital and you did not have to pat’- hospital and you did not have to pay. you are 50 when the beatles had their first pay. you are 50 when the beatles had theirfirst single, 1952. pay. you are 50 when the beatles had their first single, 1952.|j pay. you are 50 when the beatles had their first single, 1952. i thought, what a fuss they are making, 0k, their first single, 1952. i thought, what a fuss they are making, ok, so what? fine. we got married in january, 1936. we had been friends for many years before we even got married. 1978, ted had an aneurysm and just died. it really seen the end of the world for me. —— seemed. and you carried the olympic torch, didn't you? i was 100 at the time.
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it really was something. and having lived such an incredible, active life, what are your main words of life? have a positive outlook on life. get out and get exercise. i don't walk about with a long face. as long as i have got my family, which is the most important thing in my life, iam which is the most important thing in my life, i am lucky. well, those were the remarkable reflections of diana gould, who is 105. absolutely wonderful to hear from her. and so many good messages. what were they called, throw—ups? from her. and so many good messages. what were they called, throw—up57m is time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up
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this morning. we will see you in a few minutes. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. homeless families in london are being pressured to accept offers of housing outside the capital. bbc london visited one family from redbridge who had to spend christmas and the new year in this hotel room because they refused to accept the council's offer to house them in southend. 0ne housing lawyer said the lack of affordable social housing was forcing families out the capital. it's emerged that a bedbug infestation which struck the palace of westminster has not been brought under control. the managers of the westminster estate have said urgent action is being taken. the bugs are not dangerous, nor do they spread disease, but their bites can cause skin irritation. 0ne pest control expert said the infestation was discovered following a process of deduction. well, we have had a number of client where they have been repeatedly introducing bedbugs to the home. we started asking people, how do you travel to work, where do you visit?
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and a large number of people were connected with the houses of parliament and westminster. the mayor has announced london's one—hour bus hopper ticket is to go unlimited this month. the one—hour fare will be live by the end of january, allowing passengers to transfer between buses as much as they like within sixty minutes— even if they travel on the tube in between journeys. later this year, transport for london plans to introduce weekly capping on 0yster cards. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's no service on the metropolitan line between uxbridge and harrow—on—the—hill due to a tree on the track. and that same tree is also causing problems on the piccadilly line between rayners lane and uxbridge. this is how it's looking approaching the blackwall tunnel. that's the southern approach from blackwall lane following an earlier breakdown. let's have a check on the weather now. hello there.
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a very good morning to you. it is likely storm eleanor woke you overnight. it is tracking across us to the east. we saw it gusting 73 miles per hour in london. a squeeze of the isobars through the day today. sunny spells, though, at times. but when the showers come through especially gusty, the met office has a weather warning for the wind until six o'clock this evening. but, as is the nature with showers, they will be hit and miss. some fine weather as well. they will be heavy. quickly going through, with hail and thunder. nine or ten degrees on the thermometer. not feeling like it in the showers. we start tomorrow morning with the next belt of wet weather having worked in overnight. clearing up as the day goes on. largely dry with a late
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sunshine for the afternoon. a milder feel at 11—12 degrees. if you like the milder feel, make the most of tomorrow. as we head towards the weekend, temperatures are sliding away. and it does look like it will turn much colder next week. if you are heading out, please take care. that is it. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. all non—urgent operations and outpatient appointments in england are put on hold because of mounting pressure on the nhs. up to 55,000 patients are affected. senior doctors say demand has increased rapidly over the festive period. ijust want to do a good job. i want to do the best i can for the patients i am seeing. i want to do the best i can but i am not being given the resources to do that job properly.
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good morning. it's wednesday, january third. also this morning: storm eleanor brings winds of up to 84 miles an hour to many parts of the uk, causing disruption to travel and power supplies. this is the scene of the bristol channel. warnings of floods on the roads. yes, the worst may be over as the storm moves over the north sea, though we might have minor coastal flooding across england and wales. i will have you for forecasting the next 15 minutes. and a special report on how the opening of the uk's first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic conditions could change the lives of people like james dunn. within the last three or four years we have noticed a huge difference from bandages to experimental treatments and research that is going on. in the next few minutes next will be the first major retailer to tell us how sales were in the run—up to christmas. i'll have all the details shortly. in sport, manchester city are back to winning ways and are 15 points clear at the top of the table once again. they scored after just 39 seconds last night,
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comfortably beating watford. good morning. first, our main story. health chiefs in england have insisted there's no crisis in the nhs, despite their decision to extend the postponement of all non—urgent operations and routine outpatient appointments until the beginning of next month. officials say they have taken early action to ease winter pressures and avoid last minute cancellations. but senior doctors say pressure escalated rapidly over the festive period. it's estimated 55,000 patients could be affected. 0ur health editor hugh pym has more. ambulance siren. there's always great pressure on the nhs in the new year. but the strains seem even bigger this year. two ambulance services in england, covering the north—east and east, are on the highest state of operational alert, asking families to use their own transport to bring patients into hospital where possible. the trust running scarborough and york hospital said that the high numbers of patients and staff
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were under considerable pressure. there are a number of emergency departments around the country and that is the worst i have seen. ijust want to do a good job. i want to do the best i can for the patients i am seeing. i want to do the best i can but i am not being given the resources to do that job properly. twitter carried reports from some staff at other hospitals. an emergency doctor in stoke said he personally apologised to local people for what he called third world conditions due to overcrowding. nhs england has told hospitals to postpone all nonurgent operations and outpatient appointments till the end of january, an escalation of temporary measures announced just before christmas. in that time hospitals won't be penalised for putting patients in mixed sex wards. this is a planned response to a winter that we knew was going to be difficult and we are managing that in the way that we expected,
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and we are taking early action. we're not waiting to have to respond to a problem. the authorities in scotland, wales and northern ireland have said they're facing higher demand from patients and more pressure on frontline services. with flu cases on the increase, the worry is that a predicted outbreak may become a reality. hugh pym, bbc news. storm eleanor has battered the country overnight. winds gusting up to 100 miles per hour have caused flooding, damage to buildings and travel disruption. hundreds of homes across northern ireland, wales, the midlands and south—west england are without power. fallen trees have also closed a number of roads, with motorists being advised to avoid all but essential travel. jon donnison reports. as storm eleanor whipped in from the atlantic, the republic of ireland was the first to take a pounding. in galway, there's been severe flooding. some, though, are still prepared to take their chances. in the uk, the met office issued an amber weather warning for parts of the country. this is anglesey, in wales.
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waves driven by winds gusting up to 130 kilometres per hour. horizontal hail was what greeted anybody foolish enough to brave blackpool's promenade. we've got a hell of a storm here... and in corby, the midlands, john recorded the moment his house was hit by hail. across the country more than 15,000 homes have been left without power, the bulk of them in northern ireland. 0n the m25 motorway traffic was briefly brought to a standstill by a fallen tree. but the full extent of the damage will likely not emerge until later in the morning. and forecasters are warning storm eleanor will continue to bring strong winds until the end of the day. 0ur reporter andy howard is in clevedon, in somerset, where the storm struck in the early hours of this morning. just looking behind you, we can see
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the waves crashing in onshore. give us an the waves crashing in onshore. give us an idea of what it is like. still very much a coastline on redland, literally, in fact. very much a coastline on redland, literally, infact. —— very much a coastline on redland, literally, in fact. —— red alert. 0k, we have lost sound on andy there. i think you have a sense of there. i think you have a sense of the conditions. is it worth having another look? no we will have a look at the link. storm conditions affecting that as well. matt will have the weather coming up in around ten minutes. and you could see the ferocious waves behind him. more on that through the programme. president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." last month, the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, said he would reject any peace plan from the us after mr trump recognised jerusalem
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as israel's capital. in a series of tweets, mr trump also boasted to the leader of north korea about america's nuclear button. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has more. officials in peru say at least 48 people were killed when a coach plummeted down a cliff on a dangerous stretch of road near the capital, lima. a total of 50 five people were on board the bus which landed upside down on a deserted beach. the accident happened on the notorious devil's turn bend of the pacific coastal road. sarah corker reports. the blue bus landed upside down on a rocky beach, next to the pacific ocean. more than 50 people were on board when it crashed. witnesses say the coach collided with another vehicle and then went over the edge of this cliff, plummeting more than 100 metres. it happened on the notorious devil's turn of the pasamayo road, 50 kilometres from the coach's final destination, lima. the rocky site is difficult for rescuers to reach.
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survivors were winched up by rope, and some airlifted to local hospitals. translation: they told us the bus had fallen off the cliff, here in pasamayo. it was an accident. we thought that my niece had left around that time in the bus. she went with her boyfriend. the two of them were in the same seat. the pacific ocean road is often listed among the world's most dangerous roads and, despite the sheer drops, it's largely unprotected by safety fences. police say the death toll is likely to rise. sarah corker, bbc news. a man is due in court charged with murdering a woman whose body was discovered in a disused building in finsbury park in north london last week. 22—year—old iuliana tudos went missing after visiting frinds on christmas eve. 31—year—old kasim lewis will appear before magistrates in wimbledon later.
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protests against increases to rail fares are being held at a number of stations in scotland today. it comes as scotrail fares increase by an average of 3.2% this year. train operators across the uk say the biggest rise in railfares for five years is necessary to address "decades of under investment". an irish footballer has scored his first big victory of the year by winning the lottery. preston north end's kevin 0'connor was visiting family in ireland when he found out he had won a million euros. his uncle had bought him the ticket earlier in the month. kevin says he has no immediate plans for the money and his main focus was helping his team climp up the league. it is seven o'clock in the morning.
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the us says it plans to call an emergency meeting of the un security council to discuss ongoing unrest in iran. at least 22 people have been killed in anti—government demonstrations, which have been taking place since thursday. so what led up to the unrest? during the 1960s, iran embarked on a campaign of modernisation and secularisation. the country became increasingly westernised — it received american backing and its clerics were alienated. but in 1979 a revolution took place, which saw ayatollah khomeini installed as supreme leader and the country declared an islamic republic. iran's last major demonstrations took place in 2009 when millions demanded the re—run of a disputed presidential election. at least 30 people were killed and more than 1,000 protestors were detained. the latest wave of protests in which 22 people have died are the largest since then. they began last thursday, initially over price rises and corruption, but have spread amid wider anti—government feeling. we're now joined by siavush randjbar—daemi, a lecturer in iranian history from the university of manchester. good morning. good morning. could
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you give us a snapshot of the situation in the country as you see it? well, the proteas apparently have carried on into last night, so they've been going on for almost a week now, and the authorities are scrambling to contain the protests while figuring out what the long—term way of addressing the grievances of the protesters are. long—term way of addressing the grievances of the protesters arem terms of scale, commentators are saying it is not a revolution. just give us a sense of the scale of the protest you are seeing and how significant they are. according to maps compiled by iranian observers abroad, well over 50 cities have
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been involved in the protest. in geographical spread, it is remarkable and very surprising. and what i wanted to pick up on that is thatisit what i wanted to pick up on that is that is it spreading because it is happening or is it being organised? i don't think it is being organised. we don't see leadership, we don't see a central organisation. it is pent—up rage, to people in many especially smaller cities, they are set up by the adverse economic conditions, that's one reason, but often there is a political bent to it as well and it takes the form of an outright contestation of the whole political system and they are intertwined. the economic policy is devised by politicians in the end. so people put these aspects together and at times they are very radically belting out their rage on the street. what have you made of the authorities‘ reaction to it in terms of whether they are... because it
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seems relatively understated, the reaction, so far. what might change? the authorities haven‘t made use of the full gamut of options in securitising their response. for example, the irgc, the revolutionary guards, have not entered the fray of containing the protest. that would escalate things considerably? yes, it was the case in 2009. the revolutionary guard is enter the fray and there was an escalation of violence as well. there has been violence, but compared to 2009 kai wood said it has been relatively contained. ——i wood said it has been relatively contained. —— i would say. wood said it has been relatively contained. -- i would say. tell us about the ayatollah, posted on the website, blaming the countries‘ enemies of stirring up the protest. most of the channels of information iranian is use to keep up—to—date
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are based abroad. the bbc persian and london for example is very much followed in iran on satellite tv. iranians blame it for biased coverage. via in america, even channels purported to be funded by saudi arabia and the social match i —— messaging system is run by x—files and iran claims that these channels and sources of information are linked with western governments, thatis are linked with western governments, that is the main grievance —— is run by expats. how can they not clampdown in the more severe way you have described early on, how can they keep it going as it is? 0bviously they keep it going as it is? obviously the authorities are seeking actively to bring the situation to an end, however they‘ll also keep an eye on the proportional reaction based on the number of people protesting. and the key litmus test is whether the protest
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will carry on. it is only one week into them and we have to see whether in the next few weeks there will be a continuation or, because of a lack of leadership, restrictions on the telegram, the internet, the protest will quieten down. thank you very much for your time. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: 55,000 patients could be affected, as hospitals in england are told to postpone all non—urgent operations and appointments until next month. storm eleanor brings winds of up to 80 miles an hour to many parts of the uk, causing disruption to travel and power supplies. we will get the latest on storm eleanor soon. the pages. the times. we talked about it yesterday. rail prices. the rail prices minister
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ta kes prices. the rail prices minister takes flight. chris grayling is a broad. he has become the focus of criticism. he made the point they we re criticism. he made the point they were announced many months ago. this isa were announced many months ago. this is a picture of the year‘s first super is a picture of the year‘s first super moon. is a picture of the year‘s first super moon. the orbit of the moon comes super moon. the orbit of the moon co m es close super moon. the orbit of the moon comes close to the earth. a lovely picture. the storm happened overnight and did not make the pages. the mail. the nhs. the main story. and also, the picture you can see is the queen. a significant picture, because, in a bbc documentary, she is sharing childhood memories of the coronation of her father. and that is the moment she was reunited with the ground, the coronation crown. 0n the nhs story this morning as well, we will be talking to... i will check the title. professor cheteshwar lets, the director for accute care.
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—— willets. patient safety is at risk. the weather. storm eleanor has visited overnight. a live shot. you can see the force of the wind and rain. what is going on? thank you. that does not represent what is happening in the north and west. high tides. a risk of minor coastal flooding through the day. the strongest winds through the evening and overnight. peaking at 100 miles per hour in the pennines. even to the west of london, 73 miles per
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hour recorded. the strongest winds are over, thankfully. it is pushing to the north sea. 0n the southern flank we are seeing strong and gusty winds in the north and north—west. last three in the morning rush—hour. potential for it to come down, bringing trees down with it. still gusting between 40— 60 in the south. sunshine and showers to go with the gusty winds. always strongest as the show has come through. —— showers. the wind will continue to ease. persistent rain coming down. 0ccasional showers. persistent rain coming down. 0ccasionalshowers. more frequent persistent rain coming down. 0ccasional showers. more frequent in the afternoon. north england, a frosty start. not a bad day. a few showers, especially for 0rkney and
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shetland. gusty in england and wales and increasingly in northern ireland and increasingly in northern ireland and scotland in the afternoon. sunshine and showers. temperatures, not far from what they should be for this time of year. showers are fading for a time tonight in the north of the uk. quite quickly through the night, cloud rolls in again to be southern england, the midlands, wales, northern ireland, said to be wet. —— set to be wet. a cold and bright start further north. a weather system working its way in on thursday. you can see the strongest of the wind. another blustery day in southern counties of england and wales, especially later on. cloud breaking up for the morning. 12—13. further north, cloud and outbreaks of rain in northern
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england and scotland and ireland. sleet and snow. still there on friday. edging south. much colder airwill friday. edging south. much colder air will push across the uk. the good news for now is the wind is easing down. back to you, both. thank you, we will see later on. business news. some numbers to show. the first of the major retailers has shown us what they did in the christmas period. this is fascinating to see how things fared. there are so many sales in the run—up to christmas. that started in november. lots continued at different times. what‘s interesting is actually full price sales, in other words, not things discounted, did better than thought. profits
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might bea did better than thought. profits might be a bit more than previously thought. sales for full price things we re thought. sales for full price things were up1.5%. thought. sales for full price things were up 1.5%. some people are suggesting people will have struggled without discounts. also what is interesting is the weather had an impact. 0n what is interesting is the weather had an impact. on line did better than retailfor had an impact. on line did better than retail for that reason. had an impact. on line did better than retailfor that reason. there is still pressure, there is still beset people do not have as much money as they did in the past which affects much people is banned in the shops. but they are equally saying is they want to experience things. —— people spend in the shops. they may want to go to the cinema is, go get some food, and because of that, they might not buy something material to put —— cinemas. they
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specifically say experiential spending means people are not buying items of clothing. that is what happened in the retail world. we will talk about it later on in the programme. thank you. the time now is 7:22. the uk‘s first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic diseases and skin conditions has openedin diseases and skin conditions has opened in london. the centre at st thomas‘ hospital has been designed with the specialist needs of its patients in mind, featuring curved furniture and ultra—violet free lighting to prevent damaging delicate skin. graeme satchell has been to meet one patient who hopes the new unit will help to change his life for the better. st thomas‘ hospital in london. 24—year—old james dunn is heading to the new rare diseases centre. hello. nice to see you. james is here to get some news.
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0k, ome on in, james. thank you. welcome. nice and spacious. a couple of weeks ago, a consultant found a cancerous lump in his left hand. so, last week, you came, and we cut that out for you. i can tell you the good news is it is completely out. there is no cancer left. thank you. which is really great news. i have been worried about that. thank you. i was really nervous. luckily, it hasn't spread, so it is fantastic. yeah. we will celebrate later. james has a life—shortening rare genetic skin condition called epidermolysis bullosa, or eb. it affects around 5,000 people in the uk. james‘s skin, as delicate as a butterfly‘s wing.
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my type of eb means i am missing the anchors and glue between each layer of skin. i would say 80% of my body is covered in chronic wounds. i have to bandage all of the wounds. so, although you can only see my arms, i have this type of bandage from my neck down, right to the bottom of my feet. it is hard. yeah... i can't explain it. it is like your body is like this. your dad says he is over the moon. it brings together specialist services for rare conditions in one place for the first time. it will mean better conditions for people like james and more collaboration between experts. i think there are reasons to be cheerful. where before we had medicines and we just tried to patch
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people up, now we can have gene therapy, or some therapy, and hopefully, one day, eddy cue. in germany, this nine—year—old has had success for treatment to replace 80% of his skin. the new treatment will not work for everyone with eb, but it could help with a condition that is severely life limiting. the last 3—4 years, we noticed a huge difference, from bandages to experimental treatments and research that's going on all around the world. thanks. take care, safe journey. thanks. james is going home. for all of the debilitating pain of his condition, he and his mum remain resolutely upbeat. we have a good life. we have a good life, don‘t we? yeah. you don‘t know what is around the corner. keep fighting.
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keep fighting every day. james knows his time may be running out, but with the help from the new rare diseases centre and his remarkable spirit, there is always hope. graham satchell, bbc news. a remarkable young man. we wish him very well. it is time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning to be we will have the headlines at 730. —— morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. homeless families in london are being pressured to accept offers of housing outside the capital. bbc london visited one family from redbridge who had to spend christmas and the new year in this hotel room because they refused to accept the council‘s offer to house them in southend. 0ne housing lawyer said the lack
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of affordable social housing was forcing families out the capital. it‘s emerged that a bedbug infestation which struck the palace of westminster has not been brought under control. the managers of the westminster estate have said urgent action is being taken. the bugs are not dangerous, nor do they spread disease, but their bites can cause skin irritation. 0ne pest control expert said the infestation was discovered following a process of deduction. well, we have had a number of clients where they‘ve been repeatedly introducing bedbugs to the home. we can get it clear for a couple of weeks, and then the problem comes back. we started asking people, how do you travel to work, where do you visit? and a large number of people were connected with the houses of parliament and westminster. london zoo has delayed the annual animal stock take. they were going to carry it out yesterday, but it was announced it has been put on hold until february. and now for the travel situation. severe delays on
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the metropolitan line. that‘s between uxbridge and harrow—on—the—hill due to a tree on the track. and that same tree is also causing problems on the piccadilly line between rayners lane and uxbridge. this is how it‘s looking approaching the blackwall tunnel. that‘s the southern approach from blackwall lane following an earlier breakdown. hello there. a very good morning to you. it‘s likely that storm eleanor woke you for a time overnight as it tracked its way across us. it is tracking across us to the east. we saw it gusting 73 miles per hour in london. still a squeeze of the isobars
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through the day today. some showers on the strong winds as well. although there will be some sunny spells, though, at times. but when the showers come through especially gusty, the met office has a weather warning for the wind until six o‘clock this evening. but, as is the nature with showers, they will be hit and miss. some dry weather as well. some sunshine as well. some showers, and they will be heavy. quickly going through, with hail and thunder. nine or ten degrees on the thermometer. not feeling like it in the showers. we start tomorrow morning with the next belt of wet weather having worked in overnight. clearing up as the day goes on. largely dry with a late sunshine for the afternoon. a milder feel at 11—12 degrees. if you like that milder feel, make the most of tomorrow. as we head towards the weekend, the temperatures are sliding away. and it does look like it‘s going to turn much colder for next week. that is it. i will be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin.
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the time is 7:29am. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. a senior doctor from the royal college of emergency medicine has told breakfast that patient safety is being compromised health chiefs in england have insisted there‘s no crisis in the nhs, despite their decision to extend the postponement of all non—urgent operations and routine outpatient appointments until the beginning of next month. 0fficals say the move is to reduce last minute cancellations at a time when the nhs is under particular strain. patients who have spent many hours ona patients who have spent many hours on a trolley, often elderly patients, the sickest in our department, do much worse in the long—term, they make much more likely to have a poor outcome and even die as a result of experience in an emergency department. storm eleanor has battered the country overnight. winds gusting up to 100 miles per hour have caused flooding, damage to buildings and travel disruption. 12,000 homes are without power in
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northern ireland. hundreds of homes across wales, the midlands and south—west england are without power. fallen trees have also closed a number of roads, with motorists being advised to avoid all but essential travel in some areas. president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." last month, the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, said he would reject any peace plan from the us after mr trump recognised jerusalem as israel‘s capital. the united states says it plans to call an emergency session of the un security council on iran, where anti—government protests have continued for a sixth day, leaving at least 22 people dead. washington has dismissed as ridiculous a claim by iran‘s supreme leader ayatollah ali khamenei that the country‘s enemies orchestrated the unrest. the iranian government has warned it will organise counter rallies in areas where demonstrations have been strongest. officials in peru say at least 48 people were killed when a coach
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plummeted down a cliff on a dangerous stretch of road near the capital, lima. a total of 50 five people were on board the bus which landed upside down on a deserted beach. the accident happened on the notorious devil‘s turn bend of the pacific coastal road. a man is due in court charged with murdering a woman whose body was discovered in a disused building in finsbury park in north london last week. 22—year—old iuliana tudos went missing after visiting frinds on christmas eve. 31—year—old kasim lewis will appear before magistrates in wimbledon later. protests against increases to rail fares are being held at a number of stations in scotland today. it comes as scotrail fares increase by an average of 3.2% this year. train operators across the uk say the biggest rise in railfares for five years is necessary to address "decades of under investment". the queen is to make a rare apperance in a television
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documentary to comment on the experience of her coronation. in the film, which is broadcast next week, the queen is reunited with the original crown from the day. there‘ll also be interviews from those that took part in the 1953 coronation, including a maid of honour who nearly fainted in the abbey. coming up on breakfast, matt will have the weather in around ten minutes. really bad in some places with winds up really bad in some places with winds up to 100 miles an hour. first of all, we will speak with jess, and manchester city have a very early goal, that is a good description. they seem to have it all their own way this season. they went on the winning run, they scored the most goals in the premier league, and now the record for
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scoring the fastest goal this season, incredible for them. premier league leaders manchester city are back to their winning ways. they scored after just 38 seconds. they beat watford 3—1 at etihad stadium. it was far too easy for raheem sterling, tapped home from sane‘s cross. the first attack of the game. then sergio aguero scored his 16th of the season and pep guardiola‘s team are 15 points clear at the top of the table. we played really good. we could have scored i don‘t know how many goals. after dropping two points we spoke about what would be our reaction, because the big teams drop points not too much. and since the beginning we had a good performance and we won the game. victories for tottenham and crystal palace, and there was also a big win for west ham, as andy carroll scored his first two goals of the season,
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the second, a 94th—minute winner, to give them victory over fellow strugglers west brom at the london stadium. west brom are now four points from safety. it could have gone either way, the game, especially the first half, we were not good, but the second half we were much more like it. and in recent games we felt hard done by, with a decision against newcastle, we were certainly against bournemouth in the last game, and we slipped into the bottom three, and today we were rewarded for keeping at it and, sort of, just being diligent and not giving up. the fifth and final ashes test match starts this evening. england have lost the series, but they have drafted in mason crane to help construct a first victory of the tour. here‘s captainjoe root. the way he has conducted himself throughout the trip and since he has been involved in the team,
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he has been outstanding. for a young man to apply himself and absorb himself in the environment, as he has, is exactly what you are after. it is a really good chance for him to show everyone what he is capable of, but i think on this surface he will be a really good option. the wicket has a fair bit of grass and it looks a good wicket, so i would say we would opt forjust the one spinner. nathan has done a terrificjob throughout the series and, yeah, i would say we would go down that route. every opportunity we have to play on the ground is special and it is another ashes test match. we need no more motivation. it isa
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it is a great opportunity to win the series 4—0. the england head coach eddiejones has said he wont be replacing dylan hartley as england captain ahead of the six nations. hartley and his club northampton have had a disappointing season so far butjones says that‘s irrelevant and certainly isn‘t intending to lighten the skipper‘s workload either. listen to this. if he does less for england, he won‘t be with us. in terms of team meetings and all of the things that come with being captain. he has a clear role at england and that is to be captain and to be the leader. he understands that. there is no reason why what happens at northampton... it‘s like, you come home, you come from your home and you have had a bad day, you know, the tiles are falling off the bathroom, the rain‘s coming through the roof and then you have to go and coach, that‘s yourjob, to do and dylan understands it. andy murray says he may have need to have surgery after withdrawing from the brisbane international because of his long—term hip injury. the 30—year—old is down to 16th in the world, having not played sincejuly. murray said surgery was a "secondary option, something i may have to consider but let‘s hope not".
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the australian open starts in melbourne on 15th january and the briton added he would decide by the weekend whether to stay in australia or fly home. the former world number one also took to instagram and posted a picture to highlight his desire to be back on the court saying: really desperate times for andy murray. so frustrating for him. good luck to him. thank you. the time is 7:38am. whether a professional esports player or simply having fun with a bunch of friends, billions of people around the world enjoy playing video games. yet, for a small minority, it can lead to a serious addiction. now the world health organization is classifying "gaming disorder" as a mental health condition, a move that has angered some in the industry. let‘s discuss this with psychologist mark griffiths, who helped advised
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the world health organization, and addiction councillor steve pope. cani can i first get you, with your knowledge of the area, what is the distinction between a youngster, but it is not just distinction between a youngster, but it is notjust young people, who are gaming a lot, and someone who is addicted, what is your experience? the experience we see is they start to detach, school patterns, work and home and attending school all begin to break down, they become very aggressive. the test for parents at home is taking the controller off the child if they become very aggressive, so it can become like taking a glass of whiskey from an alcoholic. it is the same thing and we can‘t cover it up. alcoholic. it is the same thing and we can't cover it up. mark, you were pa rt we can't cover it up. mark, you were part of advising the who on this. how serious is it, how many people
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are affected how serious is it, how many people a re affected by how serious is it, how many people are affected by gaming disorder?m it goes on, the continuum from people who enjoy it even when they play a lot, it doesn't mean it is a problem. it is less than half of a percent we would categorise as having gaming disorder. anything from 2% to 5% have problematic gaming. if we talk about the disorder and addiction, those are at the extreme end of the spectrum who, basically, it takes over their life, compromising their relationships, work, school work, depending compromising their relationships, work, schoolwork, depending what age they are. i have spent 30 years studying video game addiction and i welcomed the move from the who. four years ago the american psychiatric association added it as a mental disorder for the first time. what we are trying to do is put this on the map. and i would like to say it is notjust map. and i would like to say it is not just about adolescents. the average gamer is in their late 205,
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early 305. it isn't average gamer is in their late 205, early 305. it i5n'tju5t average gamer is in their late 205, early 305. it isn't just about average gamer is in their late 205, early 305. it i5n'tju5t about kids. if you are calling it a mental disorder, can there be a clinical diagnosis? some research we have done ha5 diagnosis? some research we have done has suggested there are pathways into how people become addicts. a couple of months ago we published ca5e addicts. a couple of months ago we published case studies to show that gaming addiction is a lot of other thing5, the5e gaming addiction is a lot of other thing5, these are adole5cent5 between 12 and 17 years old, we found one had auti5m, one had bipolar, another had a dd and one had issue altogether. they were identical in what they played but there were different pathways as to how and why people might become a gaming addict in the first place. steve, will you pick up on how important it is that it is joining the territory of drugs, and i know that there are areas that you work in as well? i am a hands on council on the frontline, and the human brain has on the frontline, and the human brain ha5a on the frontline, and the human brain has a capacity to addict to
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anything it finds pleasurable, and gaming is anything it finds pleasurable, and gaming i5a anything it finds pleasurable, and gaming is a silent epidemic. every family is facing an issue with it. i don't think it is a small percentage. it is a large percentage. it is a large percentage. now it is labelled, we don't get well from label5, now it i5 don't get well from label5, now it is labelled with have the opportunity that it is out and people reali5e opportunity that it is out and people realise the problem. i opportunity that it is out and people realise the problem. lam opportunity that it is out and people realise the problem. i am a dad, i have kids, i like to hours of quiet when they play on the ipad, but i watch how much they are on it. help us with this, if you say you think a family member or yourself has a drug addiction, you may think there is a pathway to getting help. if you‘re sitting at home thinking, maybe someone in my family has a gaming addiction, what would you do, where do you go? now, hopefully, the nhs can look at it, and we've been working in the field treating children and young adults with gaming addiction for the last five year5. gaming addiction for the last five years. there is help out there. and
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we run a self—help group every week and we have for a number of years. we have been victimised, we have been laughed at, we have beenjeered at, the big companies have come out with all sorts of accu5ation5, but there is help. i want to pick up one of those points with you, mark, because how could this be treated and how is it treated? in terms of 5tudie5 and how is it treated? in terms of studies published, cognitive behavioural therapy is the number one treatment of choice. anyone who think5 one treatment of choice. anyone who thinks they have a problem, my advice is to get a referral from agp two x advice is to get a referral from agp toni advice is to get a referral from agp two x i quite. that is hard, there i5 two x i quite. that is hard, there is waiting with out there. in terms of risk, there is a continuum —— from agp to a psychologist. if you are somebody where it, if it is conflicting something in your life, if it is your personal relationships
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or family, it is taking over your work etc, that'5 or family, it is taking over your work etc, that's when you need help. there are what we call pharmacotherapy, certain drugs to reduce the craving5 pharmacotherapy, certain drugs to reduce the cravings and the urge5 that are out there. self—help group5 and one—on—one counselling et cetera. the5e and one—on—one counselling et cetera. these are all things that have shown to help in terms of getting people to overcome gaming addiction. it is one of those thing5. computers are so endemic in live5. thing5. computers are so endemic in lives. for those people who are playing it is very hard to go in your day—to—day life without coming acr055 your day—to—day life without coming across the chance to play. we are surrounded by them. thank you very much. 7:44am is the time now and we are keeping a close eye on the weather for you this morning. are keeping a close eye on the weatherfor you this morning. if are keeping a close eye on the weather for you this morning. if you wa nt weather for you this morning. if you want a little sample of how it is looking, this is somerset on the coast. and you can see the waves coming in with some extreme conditions. we have been told by matt, on the weather this morning, that we have gusts in place of up to 100 miles an
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hour, is it right? the wind peaked at 100mph. that has caused debris and damage. we still have some gusty winds to come. the strongest are done with, that is the good news. storm eleanor is pushing off to the north sea. but around the south, we still have strong wind. when you see showers, the wind will be at its strongest. the full moon means tides are high. more waves crashing into the coast. flood warnings in the south. some sunshine, a few showers. they will rattle through quickly on the breeze. some rain in the north—east
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of england and yorkshire and that will gradually go away. showers in the west of scotland and northern ireland. the best of the weather to the north—east of the mainland of scotland. the driest and calmest conditions. showers elsewhere coming and going in the breeze. some will see more than others. northern ireland, they will become frequent. the wind will pick up. not the levels overnight. the average temperature is. cooler than yesterday, especially in the breeze. showers will fade away in the north. frost could form. the south—west, after a clear start almost southern england, the midlands, wales, northern ireland, wet by first light on monday morning. there could be minor flooding. on monday morning. there could be minorflooding. wet on monday morning. there could be minor flooding. wet and windy on monday morning. there could be minorflooding. wet and windy in on monday morning. there could be minor flooding. wet and windy in the south. strong and gusty winds in the english channel. it will brighten up
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in the south tomorrow. temperatures could be 12— 13 degrees. rain in northern england, southern scotland, and look at the temperatures. a cold day. sleet sleet and snow over the high ground. that area will go south on friday. a messy weather story on friday. 0utbreaks on friday. a messy weather story on friday. 0utbrea ks of on friday. a messy weather story on friday. outbreaks of rain and sleet and snow. a sign of things turning much more cold as we go to the weekend. instead of complaining about the wind and rain, we will complain about the bitterness coming with the wind. there is always something. thank you. 55,000 patients could be affected, as hospitals in england are told to postpone all non—urgent operations and appointments until next month. 0ne senior doctor has told us a
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short while ago safety is being compromised. we will talk to the director for care compromised. we will talk to the directorfor care at compromised. we will talk to the director for care at nhs compromised. we will talk to the directorfor care at nhs england. could you give us your analysis this wednesday morning of the situation we find ourselves in? yes. the national emergency panel made up of senior clinicians, having listened carefully to front—line colleague doctors and nurses, and listening to be at bending effort is necessary in some hospitals to manage demand and provide care, on that, for those reasons, and the fact we are starting to see a rise in the flu in the community and cold weather warnings coming through, we should be giving clear permission to
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hospitals and doctors and nurses across the nhs that, if it is appropriate, they have permission to reduce the amount of planned activity in terms of operations to avoid last—minute cancellations, which are disruptive to patients. we need to have mid—sex wards, because the most six patients have to be treated first. —— sick. and we have to reduce routine outpatient work so that we can discharge patients in cost —— hospital waiting to go home. we spoke to susan mason. her assessment of the situation this morning is that safety is being compromised, patient safety is being compromised, patient safety is being compromised, and that elderly patients in particular are more likely to die because of the situation in our hospitals. do you agree? urgent and emergency care is
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all about managing risk. to reduce the risk of harm. that is what staff do minute by minute, our —— hour by hour. they are managing the risk. we have to be clear. she is saying something else. she is saying the situation colleagues are plotting to her is safety, as of now, is being compromised, and elderly people in particular are likely to die —— reporting. i am concerned when i hear from colleagues in reporting. i am concerned when i hearfrom colleagues in the reporting. i am concerned when i hear from colleagues in the service they feel situations are like that. that is exactly why the panel of senior clinicians yesterday got together and look at the evidence, having listened to those messages from the service, and said, look, we have 100,000 beds in the nhs. 40% of them are routinely occupied by plant care. we will not suggest those waiting for cancer operations will
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be postponed. —— planned care. but there is an enormous reserve the nhs needs to lean on to free up the space, get the flow of patients going to be hospitals, so safety concerns talked about by susan mason can be diminished. more patients are coming to the hospitals as we speak. asi coming to the hospitals as we speak. as i understand, it is being reported across the country. there are no beds across most of england available as we speak. this crisis is deepening, is it not? we are responding. the first few weeks of january in particular are always the busiest times in the nhs through the winter because of seasonal illness and flu breathlessness. we always see this. but we have gone through this winter better prepared than ever. the discharge rate was down. we cancelled fewer operations than
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previously this time. we now need to implement this response and be clear we are giving permission to be hospitals and doctors to change the way they practise in order to increase the movement of patients through hospitals. if i increase the movement of patients through hospitals. ifi may, could i share a few thoughts from viewers chelsea says my husband recently had to go to accident and emergency twice over the christmas period. it was horrendous both times. no chairs. people had to sit on the floor. no cubicles for patients. many receiving treatment in corridors. we waited 11 hours to see a junior doctor at 4am. we had to come back and waited a further 15 hours on the second visit. the picture that is emerging, and you know this very well, is that the nhs
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and accident and emergency is in crisis, but there is no plan b. you cancelled the operations, which we understand. that does not free up the beds. the situation is worsening. wendy you bring in more people as opposed to cancelling things? it does free up the beds. -- when do you. the best way to free them up is to use the 40,000 beds made available for planned care... they are all full! there is a lot of elective work and planned activity. you can use the staff and beds to increase the flow. are you saying there are three beds at the moment? there are beds occupied by elective treatment. that is what we are giving permission to reduce. we want
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them to reduce that to free them up to allow important patients in. the experiences you heard this morning are concerning. that is exactly why we are taking these actions, part of the winter pressure protocol which would be implemented if we reached this position. to be clear, given the pressure on the organisation, how many beds are you saying will be made available by the cancelling of operations? how many? that is a local decision. some hospitals have much greater difficulties than others. in some hospitals, with no difficulties, some planned care can continue. in other hospitals, i would imagine many of the patients having planned operations, not cancer, not operations with rapid deterioration, that will be freed up. the national emergency pressure panel will be meeting soon?
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up. the national emergency pressure panel will be meeting 500mm up. the national emergency pressure panel will be meeting soon? it will be called on a regular basis to re—evaluate the pressure in the system and look at all the indicators we have so we can best support the front—line staff doing an outstanding job under these circumstances. we have had an anonymous message from someone working in the nhs on what they call the coastal southern nhs hospital. my the coastal southern nhs hospital. my staff and myself are beyond breaking point. given what you are hearing from people going to hospital, should there not be daily meetings to discuss the situation which changes by the day? we are looking at the... we collect data every single day. that is look at every single day. that is look at every single day. that is look at every single day, nationally, regionally, and locally. what the pressure panel is called for is when it is believed we need to look again at the changes we need to make in the actions we take in order to help support the system and the
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front—line staff. support the system and the front-line staff. professor, thank you very much for your time this morning. i appreciate that. we have read out some of the e—mails we have received from people. many are full of praise for the staff working in these conditions. absolutely. that isa these conditions. absolutely. that is a clear message. thank you for your stories. this is another example. my mother was taken to a north—western hospital in early december and asked them from 1045 at night until 615 the following morning waiting for her to be seen. she was on a trolley all night and she is 96 years old. many different stories. thank you very much for getting in touch with us. it is time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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i‘m alpa patel. homeless families in london are being pressured to accept offers of housing outside the capital. bbc london visited one family from redbridge who had to spend christmas and the new year in this hotel room because they refused to accept the council‘s offer to house them in southend. 0ne housing lawyer said the lack of affordable social housing was forcing families out the capital. 0rdinary people doing ordinaryjobs just cannot make ends meet, and that is creating relentless pressure, pushing people to be peripheries of london, pushing people outside of london, tearing up the communities, pulling people out of work, pulling people out of school. it is just not good enough. it‘s emerged that a bedbug infestation which struck the palace of westminster has not been brought under control. the managers of the westminster estate have said urgent action is being taken.
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the bugs are not dangerous, nor do they spread disease, but their bites can cause skin irritation. the mayor has announced london‘s one—hour bus hopper ticket is to go unlimited this month. the one—hour fare will be live by the end of january, allowing passengers to transfer between buses as much as they like within sixty minutes— even if they travel on the tube in between journeys. later this year, transport for london plans to introduce weekly capping on 0yster cards. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s minor delays on the metropolitan line between uxbridge and harrow—on—the—hill due to a tree on the track. let‘s have a check on the weather now. hello there. a very good morning to you. it‘s likely that storm eleanor woke you for a time overnight as it tracked its way across us.
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it is tracking across us to the east. we saw it gusting 73 miles per hour in london. still a squeeze of the isobars through the day today. some showers on the strong winds as well. although there will be some sunny spells, though, at times. but when the showers come through especially gusty, the met office has a weather warning for the wind until six o‘clock this evening. but, as is the nature with showers, they will be hit and miss. some dry weather as well. some sunshine as well. some showers, and they will be heavy. quickly going through with hail and thunder. nine or ten degrees on the thermometer. not feeling like it in the showers. we start tomorrow morning with the next belt of wet weather having worked in overnight. clearing up as the day goes on. largely dry with a late sunshine for the afternoon. a milder feel at 11—12 degrees. if you like that milder feel, make the most of tomorrow. as we head towards the weekend, the temperatures are sliding away. and it does look like it‘s going to turn much colder for next week. if you are heading out, please take care. that is it.
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i will be back in half an hour. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. all non—urgent operations and outpatient appointments in england are put on hold because of mounting pressure on the nhs. up to 55,000 patients are affected. 0ne senior doctor tells this programme the conditions mean safety is being compromised. good morning. it‘s wednesday, 3rd january. also this morning: storm eleanor brings winds of up to 100 miles in parts of the uk, causing disruption to travel and power supplies. this is the scene on the bristol channel.
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there are warnings of floods and treacherous conditions on the roads. the worst of the storm may have headed off into the north sea. i will have the full forecast before 8.15am. we have a special report on how the opening of the uk‘s first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic conditions could change the lives of people like james dunn. the last three or four years we‘ve noticed a huge differences from bandages to experimental treatments and research that‘s going on. whether we streamed it, downloaded it or bought a cd, next has been the first retailer to tell us how sales were in the run—up to christmas. in sport, manchester city are back to winning ways and setting yet more milestones. they scored the fastest goal of the premier league season so far — 38 seconds, during their win over watford last night.
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good morning. first, our main story. the director of acute care at nhs england has insisted patient safety is not being compromised. health chiefs in england have insisted the nhs is not in crisis, despite their decision to extend the postponement of all non—urgent operations and routine outpatient appointments until the beginning of next month. the action which is expected to affect 55,000 patients was taken to ease winter pressures and avoid last minute cancellations. our health editor, hugh pym, has more. ambulance siren. there‘s always great pressure on the nhs in the new year. but the strains seem even bigger this year. two ambulance services in england, covering the north—east and east, are on the highest state of operational alert, asking families to use their own transport to bring patients into hospital where possible. the trust running scarborough and york hospitals said
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high numbers of patients and staff were under considerable pressure. i‘ve worked in a number of different emergency departments around the country and that‘s the worst i have seen. ijust want to do a good job. i want to do the best i can for the patients that i‘m seeing., but i‘m not being given the resources to do thatjob properly. twitter carried reports from some staff at other hospitals. an emergency doctor in stoke said he personally apologised to local people for what he called third world conditions due to overcrowding. nhs england has told hospitals to postpone all non—urgent operations and outpatient appointments until the end of january, an escalation of temporary measures announced just before christmas. in that time hospitals won‘t be penalised for putting patients in mixed sex wards. this is a planned response to a winter that we knew was going to be difficult and we are managing that in the way that we expected and we‘re taking early action.
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we are not waiting to have to respond to a problem. the authorities in scotland, wales and northern ireland have said they‘re facing high demand from patients and more on frontline services. with flu cases on the increase, the worry now is that a predicted outbreak may become a reality. earlier susan mason told us on this programme that mounting strain on the health service means patient safety is being compromised. patients who spend many hours on a trolley, they are the sickest patients in our department, do much worse in the long—term. they are more likely to have a poor outcome and even die as a result of their experience in the emergency department. thank you to all of you who are getting in touch about that story. we will look at some of your contact later. storm eleanor has battered the country overnight. winds gusting up to 100mph have caused flooding, damage to buildings
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and travel disruption. hundreds of homes across northern ireland, wales, the midlands and south west england are without power. fallen trees have also closed a number of roads, with motorists being advised to avoid all but essential travel in some areas. jon donnison reports. as storm eleanor whipped in from the atlantic, the republic of ireland was the first to take a pounding. in galway, there‘s been severe flooding. some though still prepared to take their chances. in the uk, the met office issued an amber weather warning for parts of the country. this is anglesey in wales. waves driven by winds gusting up to 80mph. horizontal hail was what greeted anyone foolish enough to brave blackpool‘s promenade. we‘ve got a hell of a storm here... and in corby, the midlands, john wright recorded the moment his house was hit by hail. across the country more than 15,000 homes have been left without power,
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the bulk of them in northern ireland. 0n the m25 motorway, traffic was briefly brought to a standstill by a fallen tree. but the full extent of the damage will likely not emerge until later in the morning and forecasters are warning storm eleanor will continue to bring strong winds until the end of the day. 0ur reporter, andy howard, is in clevedon in somerset, where the storm struck in the early hours of this morning. the conditions are rough down there. describe what it‘s like for us. the conditions are rough down there. describe what it's like for us. yes, it is rough, charlie. it‘s a coastline very much still on red alert. there are 14 flood warnings still in place from gloucestershire up still in place from gloucestershire up in that direction behind me to north somerset here and on down the coast towards devon and cornwall. that means that flooding is likely and look over my shoulder and you can see why. this is high tide at
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clevedon. a big one too, brought to us by the first full moon of 2018. add to that 40mph plus winds, leads to scenes like this. the coastguard told me this is the highest he has seen told me this is the highest he has seen it in four years and on that day there was considerable damage caused. i‘m hearing of homes waking up caused. i‘m hearing of homes waking up in somerset to no power, about 120 of them along across minehead and cheddar and further up the coast in bridgwater, the environment agency set up a special unit to deal with this and to try and monitor this stretch of water. they leave us with two warnings. 0ne if you‘re coming to the seaside stay up and stay away and also a more 21st century warning of don‘t take storm selfies, you could end up in more danger than you were before. the one line from the environment agency they are fearful of tomorrow evening. another high tide is expected along this somerset coast.
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andy, thank you very much. that‘s andy howard reporting from clevedon in somerset for us. president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." last month, the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas, said he would reject any peace plan from the us after mr trump president trump has threatened to withhold financial aid to the palestinians because he says they are "no longer willing to talk peace." a man is due in court charged with murdering a woman whose body was discovered in a disused building in finsbury park in north london last week. 22—year—old, iuliana tudos, went missing after visiting friends on christmas eve. 31—year—old kasim lewis will appear before magistrates in wimbledon later. officials in peru say at least 48 people were killed when a coach plummeted down a cliff on a dangerous stretch of road near the capital, lima. a total of 55 five people were on board the bus which landed upside down on a deserted beach.
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the accident happened on the notorious devil‘s turn bend of the pacific coastal road. protests against rail fares are being held in scotland. train operators in the uk say the biggest rise in five years is necessary to address decades of under investment. an irish footballer has scored his first big victory of the year by winning the lottery. preston north end‘s kevin 0‘connor was visiting family in ireland when he found out he had scooped a million euros after his uncle had bought him the ticket. kevin says he has "no immediate plans" on how to spend the money and that his main focus is helping his team climb up the league. he is pictured with his family. i imagine they can help him spend the money! a nice way to start the new year, is it not. all the sport and the weather coming up all the sport and the weather coming
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up later on. one of scotland yard‘s most senior officers has called on londoners to "pull together" to reduce knife crime. sir craig mackey made the comments after four young men were stabbed to death in separate attacks over new year. now, the city‘s mayor, sadiq khan, is urging more schools to use metal detectors to help tackle the problem. let‘s get more from london‘s deputy mayor for policing and crime, sophie linden. good morning. thank you very much ch thank you very much indeed for joining us. good morning. it is a terrible toll over new year‘s eve and last year in london. just tell usa and last year in london. just tell us a little bit about this idea behind metal detectors, how might that help? before i do talk about how we are working with schools i do wa nt to how we are working with schools i do want to extend my deepest condolences to the families of the four young men who tragically lost their lives over new year. they it must have been appalling for them. what we are trying to do in london and what we have been doing for a while is working with schools. 0ne of the things we did in the autumn was to write out to all schools in london to offer them the use of a
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knife wand. we want all schools to be safe environments for young people to come to so they can do what they are there in school to do, to learn and achieve and today we are writing out again to remind them of this offer. we have had over 70 schools take up this offer, to use knife wands and to start to use knife wands and to start to use knife wands and to start to use knife wands in their schools and we hope it will not only send a strong message to young people not to carry knives, absolutely not to bring them to school, but ensure that schools are safe environments. of those 70 schools, which are already using this system, how many knives are they finding? have you got any evidence to tell you that? we have offered the schools the use of the knife wands and we are sending them out to schools by the safer schools officers who are in over 300 schools. we aren‘t collecting the knives. it is up to schools and headteachers when they use them. we hope they will use them when they need to. are they secondary and
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primary schools? we have written to rhymery schools and colleges and pupil referral units. we hope by headteachers being able to use knife wands, when they feel it is appropriate that they make sure their young people know it is the wrong thing to do to carry knives and the wrong thing to do to bring them into school. i have spoken to headteachers who already use knife wands and they found them an effective instrument to be able to really get the message across to young people that it is never appropriate to carry a knife. ok. and just give us an idea of how, if you can, they are using them, is it they are stopping pupils at the front door and searching them or how does it work? we are saying to headteachers if you want a knife wand, we‘ll give you a knife wand and it is up to you in discussion with your safer schools officer from the metropolitan police to decide how to use it. some headteachers use them on intermittent basis when young people are coming to schools,
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others use them as and when it is necessary. is it like a metal detector? it is like if you have been into a nightclub or through an airport security and you set off the beep, the headteacher can use it to see if a pupil is carrying something that they shouldn‘t be carrying. just give us an idea as well of the age that you think that children are starting to carry knives? we know, i‘ve spoken to lots of young people about why they carry knives. sometimes it is fairly young people. young children who are thinking about carrying knives, but it does carry across all the ages. we want to make sure we are working not only with the police and schools, but with the police and schools, but with local authorities and hospitals to really get that message across to young people that it doesn‘t make young people that it doesn‘t make you safer to carry a knife. it makes your life, it puts your life in danger. and that's one of the questions i wanted to ask you because many young people when you speak to, they have spoken to them here on bbc breakfast said they
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might be carrying a knife for their protection, so how to you change that? when we were implementing the knife crime strategy, we spoke to a number of young people and we surveyed young people as well about why they carried knives. a lot of them said they carried it for their own protection because they felt scared. so we‘ve clearly got to get the message across to young people that it doesn‘t make you safer to carry a knife. it makes your life more in danger. we are talking to young people, working with them and trying to get the message across, but it is also giving them the right education, the aspirations and the real understanding that their lives are, they have got great opportunities in their lives and they really need to go to school, learn what they need to learn and look to see what opportunities there are and london is a great city and there are fantastic opportunities out there. thank you. we‘re keeping you up—to—date on the
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weather conditions and storm eleanor. matt, tell us how it is shaping up. very good morning to you. things are improving tonight. there is a tree down here, as you can see from one of our weather watchers in hampshire. gusts peaked at around 100 mph on the tops of the pennines last night. even in west london we saw winds for a time over 70 mph. the winds are using down. they are going to remain strong and gusty. the core of storm eleanor is now pushing off into the north sea. 0n the southern edge of it we have some strong and gusty winds. winds still gusting 50, 60 mph this morning across parts of central southern wells and central southern england.
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zhao was rifling through as well. they could come with hail and thunder. the other impact we are having as we saw earlier in clevedon is with high tides at the moment, and those strong winds, certainly around the western areas, we will see some further coastal flooding. improving conditions in north—east england where it is still very grey at the moment. and some showers the northern ireland and western scotland. by far the best conditions today are in the north of mainland scotland. we start the day frosty but with light winds. there will be a lot of dry weather around today. zhao was pushing through quite smartly on the breeze and into this afternoon it will be south—west scotla nd afternoon it will be south—west scotland and northern ireland where the showers are most frequent. temperatures this afternoon where they should be for the time of year, a bit cooler than yesterday in the breeze. breeze is down tonight which
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will allow a frost to form in scotland. by tomorrow morning in northern ireland northern england and the west midlands you will be waking up to lots of water. fairly windy conditions through the english channel. the sunshine comes out, the rain band heads across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland, and with cold air in place, there will be further sleet and snow over the hills. after the wet morning, sunny spells and mild conditions further south. into friday, we have rain, and sleet snow pushing their way southwards once again. notice the temperatures are dropping and they will drop further into the weekend. get prepared because cold weather is back with us this weekend, and with it a bitter wind as well, particularly for england and wales. back to you both. i love the way you say that with a smile on yourface! thank
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i love the way you say that with a smile on your face! thank you. next, the retailer have released their profits. god mcgregor is the key time up to christmas eve where business analysts will be working out how well they did. no isa out how well they did. no is a prized bit of festive period isa no is a prized bit of festive period is a key time for retailers —— knows a prize that the festive period is a key time for retailers like next. sales were up and in particular, they did better online this year than last year. with me is kate ha rd castle than last year. with me is kate hardcastle who is a retail analyst. good morning to you. next is an interesting one because they do not do all the discounting that we see in lots of other shops but for the first time ever they dipped their to into the black friday sales. they hold really firm and they want to have the big 5ale5 hold really firm and they want to have the big sales to have maximum
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impact. they say no to black friday. thi5 impact. they say no to black friday. this year they dip their toe in that they did it with old 5eason5 5tock. that is not really the idea of it. it is meant to be a discount on the current range. they did get some critici5m current range. they did get some criticism for that. they have cited cold—weather a5 criticism for that. they have cited cold—weather as being a benefit for them, people having to wrap up in knitwear". but cold—weather will have affected all the retailers and i'm not sure it will have had a positive effect on everyone. they mentioned how well they did online this year compared to previous years because next had struggled in the past with the online side of the business. five years ago they were looking pretty well on the high 5treet looking pretty well on the high street and online. 0nline dipped a little bit because they will pretty much one of the first pioneers of fashion to have that and then other brand5 came in. their competition is the likes of everyone from the zahra
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hu55ain brought high fashion to the marketplace and through to the supermarket brand5. marketplace and through to the supermarket brands. what i think is people like the fact they know what next is, what the quality of and they have bought online to save going into store. the other interesting thing that you and i look at is what they are saying about their future. one of the key lines in that is about this idea of experiential shopping, and how they are worried about that. explain what this is. i think this is fascinating and really important. they are saying our competition is notjust anotherjumper in another saying our competition is notjust another jumper in another store, saying our competition is notjust anotherjumper in another store, it is eating out, travel, experiences and bars. they will be looking at ways to bring more data into stores. i will expect more cafes but they will be looking at ways to attract customers back into buying fashion. we have been buying less of that stuff. we want less stuff and more out of our lives. it is a big problem for retailers and at least
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next have acknowledged it. essentially, we have not got as much money to spend so when we do we may not buy an item of clothing, we are more likely to do something that will fill our day. absolutely, because it is all about social media and making sure we live life to the fullest and you don't necessarily need another jumper to do fullest and you don't necessarily need anotherjumper to do that! thank you, kate. thank you, both. the uk‘s first dedicated treatment centre for people with rare genetic diseases and skin conditions has opened in london. the centre at st thomas‘ hospital has been designed with the specialist needs of its patients‘ in mind, featuring curved furniture and ultra—violet free lighting to prevent damaging delicate skin. graham satchell has been to meet one patient who hopes the new unit will help to change his life for the better. st thomas‘ hospital in london. 24—year—old james dunn is heading to the new rare diseases centre. hello.
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james is here to get some news. 0k, ome on in, james. thank you. welcome. nice and spacious. a couple of weeks ago, a consultant found a cancerous lump in his left hand. so, last week, you came, and we cut that out for you. i can tell you the good news is it is completely out. there is no cancer left. thank you. which is really great news. thank you! i was worried about that. thank you. i was really nervous. luckily, it hasn‘t spread, so it is fantastic. yeah. we will celebrate later. you wrap me that good. james has a life—shortening rare genetic skin condition called epidermolysis bullosa, or eb. it affects around 5,000 people in the uk. james‘s skin, as delicate
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as a butterfly‘s wing. my type of eb means i am missing the anchors and glue in between each layer of skin. i would say 80% of my body is covered in chronic wounds. i have to bandage all of the wounds. so, although you can only see my arms, i have this type of bandage from my neck down, right to the bottom of my feet. it is hard. yeah... i can‘t explain it. it is like your body is burning, or i don‘t know. your dad is made up. says he is over the moon. the newly—opened centre brings together specialist services for rare conditions in one place for the first time. it will mean better conditions for patients like james and more collaboration between experts. i think there are reasons to be cheerful. whereas before we‘ve just had medicines and trying to patch people up, now we‘ve got opportunities
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to provide more effective treatments through gene therapy, or cell therapy, and hopefully, one day, a cure. in germany, nine—year—old hassan has had a highly—experimental treatment to successfully replace 80% of his skin. the new treatment will not work for everyone with eb, but it may offer hope with a condition that is severely life—limiting. in the last 3—4 years, we‘ve noticed a huge difference, from bandages to experimental treatments and research that‘s going on all around the world. thanks. take care, safe journey. thanks. james is going home. for all of the debilitating pain of his condition, he and his mum remain resolutely upbeat. we have a good life, don't we? yeah. you don't know what is around the corner. we keep fighting, don't we?
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yeah, keep fighting every day. james knows his time may be running out, but with the help from the new rare diseases centre and his remarkable spirit, there is always hope. graham satchell, bbc news. i love that we ended with his laugh. he is such a remarkable young man. it does put things into perspective toa it does put things into perspective to a degree. i like that phrase, keep fighting. we wishjames well in the months to come. and thank you for talking to us. still to come on the programme this morning...” remember this huge thing coming over shoreditch. i had never seen anything like it before. we have some interesting people on the
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programme. this year marks the centenary programme. this year marks the ce nte nary of programme. this year marks the centenary of the first world war. we will be speaking to one woman who lived through it and the huge social change which followed. 105 years old, she looks fantastic! amazing recollections. it is worth saying as well, if you like your cooking, you will have heard of tom kerridge, the chef and tv presenter. now he‘s literally half the man he was. that is his own phrase. he has lost 12 stone and he is on a new programme helping people lose weight forever. he will be here later with some recipes, fingers crossed, as well. he will be passing on some of his knowledge. it isa it is a remarkable story. that is coming up later and we will keep you up—to—date with the weather situation. 100 mile an hour winds in some places. now the news, travel and it will be very windy today. behind
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it, notice the squeeze on the isobars. it will be a very windy day. generally gusting 40 to 50mph, but for exposed areas up to 70mph. so if you are travelling take care. there could be trees down. tune into your bbc local stations for the latest travel report. generally todayis latest travel report. generally today is a day of sunshine and showers. some of the showers mixed with hail and thunder. gradually as we head on into the afternoon the winds will start to ease and fewer showers across parts of the south and the west. just a few isolated showers for the end of today. generally it is dry with limited amounts of brightness, the temperatures up to about ten celsius in london. across much of wales, it‘s dry, but rather gusty. especially for exposed areas in the
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west and those showers will continue across northern ireland, england, and western parts of scotland, but across north—east scotland, largely dry with clear skies, but feeling rather cold indeed. as we head on into tonight, the next weather front will push out from the south—west, hitting colder air as it reaches further north and the potential for snow on higher ground. the temperatures tonight not dropping very much in the south, five to nine celsius, but chilly in scotland. tomorrow this weather front continues its journey north and eastwards. some heavy pulses like, but behind it, by the afternoon we can look forward to something drier and brighter across parts of the south and west. still mild in the south. temperatures up to about 13 celsius, but chilly further north. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. changing the rules — europe gets to grips with the biggest changes to the financial system
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since the financial crisis. live from london, that‘s our top story on wednesday, 3rd january. the eu is aiming to protect investors and boost competition but can the lengthy new rules really be made to work? also in the programme: the united states blocks the billion dollar takeover of moneygram by china‘s alibaba because of national security concerns. and cutting the cables.
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